Tag Archives: fish habitat

Landcare learning about landscape function

The following post is a reprint of an article published in our local “Landcare Perspective” which is a newsletter put out by the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Council (a district level Landcare association, or ‘DLA’). The post was prompted by the article shown below, which appeared in the Winter-Spring 2014 edition of the Perspective….

The Bank Job Article from the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Perspective

The Bank Job Article from the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Perspective

….and, to a lesser extent by this ‘placestories’ video, which is also about ‘the Bank Job’ project.

The most stimulating aspect of these reports about ‘the Bank Job’ was that they both repeatedly blamed a single willow for causing the 10m deep incision that it was growing at the bottom of! No other causes were ever mentioned. Continue reading

Retarding Australia to an ecological nonsense

It will no doubt become a recurring theme of Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare to point out the limited perspectives informing destructive nativist activities in Australia (and elsewhere). These perspectives are dominated by such a narrow form of Ecology that they are effectively a reductionist science (anathema to a broader Ecological epistemology and understanding).

‘Natural Ecology’, as it’s widely practiced by professional and lay-ecologists in environmental groups and NRM bureaucracies, has become simply a “science” of naming, categorising, and compiling inventories, of species. So much so that these preoccupations often substitute for any real knowledge of how bio-physical systems actually function.

Continue reading

Willows for fish habitat.

Expert fishermen near Canberra are happy to share the secrets of catching huge native fish that can be found sheltering within the habitat provided under willows. The trick is to fish in the winter when the willows are dormant and their dense protective canopies no longer shelter these fish from anglers or other predatory threats.

Image courtesy Team Goodang Fishing

Who would know better where the biggest native fish (and the fattest, apparently) can be found than a madly enthusiastic, dedicated and experienced fisherman? Continue reading