Tag Archives: Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Council

Non-destructive revegetation at Flood Creek

Our non-destructive revegetation trial is now under way at Flood Creek. Many thanks are due to the Green Army team that came and helped, consisting of: Alex, Dylan, Tiarnah, Nicole and Chloe. Thanks Guys! The team was provided by Skillset under the auspices of the Federal Government’s Green Army programme and was locally hosted by the Upper Shoalhaven Landcare Council.

green army

Nicole, Tiarnah, Dylan, Chloe and Alex at the end of the second day’s planting.

We planted a mix of casuarinas and teatree alongside a section of Flood Creek on the Braidwood Common. These were interspersed in some areas with snowgums, yellowbox, blackwood, red-stem wattle and callistemon. All up, around 800 native trees and shrubs went in. Further plantings will follow over time.

For those who are unfamiliar with the concept of non-destructive revegetation, I’ll give a brief outline of the theory. The main point is that we didn’t begin this planting work by destroying any of the existing riparian habitat. Although this section of Flood Creek is currently stabilised by non-natives (mainly willows and hawthorns), we don’t see removing these plants as necessary or desirable in order to increase biodiversity and habitat value.

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A new native tree, augmenting the existing habitat and biodiversity at Flood Creek

Several native animal species already utilise the riparian corridor along Flood Creek (including swamp wallaby, wombats and platypus). Destruction of the existing vegetation would obviously cause massive ecological disturbance and probably make this area uninhabitable for decades. Moreover, removal of mature riparian trees accelerates peak flows, increasing the likelihood of downstream flooding and raising the risk of local erosion, as occurs time after time following willow destruction activities–sometimes misnamed “revegetation”. Many Australians are opposed to this form of environmental destruction, but the removal industry remains profitable due to outdated environmental funding programmes.

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Two great landscape rehydration field days

Hi folks,

There’ll be two excellent Natural Sequence Farming and landscape rehydration field days held consecutively on Nov 7th and 8th near Bungendore, NSW. I expect every innovative Landcarer in the country will be there, or will die trying to get there, for one or both of these days.

The first (Nov 7th) is a tour to see restorative bed structures on Turallo Creek at the “the Gib”.

(Click the image below to see the full-sized flyer.)

Turallo Ck field day 7th November

The structures installed at the Gib were put in by the landholder using ordinary farm equipment and have had a great effect on what was once a dry and eroded gully. This is another example of an empowered land manager doing excellent practical work that positively benefits landscape health and farm productivity. As it turns out, existing regulatory frameworks have made this beneficial process more difficult than it should be.

These frameworks will be discussed in more detail at the second field day (Nov 8th) which will be a tour of Mulloon Creek Natural Farms. Attendees will inspect and discuss the Natural Sequence Farming rehydration works completed here nine years ago. See the beneficial effects of these structures and hear about how the Mulloon Institute, in partnership with other organisations, is now supporting the Mulloon Creek community to work together on a multi-property catchment-wide rehydration effort.

(Click the image below)

Mulloon Creek field day 8th November

Both field days will be well-attended and are bound to promote some great discussion and learning opportunities. Spread the word and be there!

 

Non-nativist progress.

Hi all,

This post represents a bit of a recap and update on where things are at.

Experienced participants/observers can skip the following background and overview if desired and go straight to the list of group/blog activity updates below.

Background and overview

Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare Group is a grassroots community of people who wish to improve the health, productivity and ecological well-being of Country. This is the mission of most Landcarers: ‘caring for the land‘. Our group is particularly focused upon the urban and peri-urban riparian zones within Braidwood, NSW (especially the existing plants and animals of the non-nativist forest along Flood Creek).

Dense vegetation at Flood Creek

Flood Creek riparian vegetation

Beyond this, we also have an interest in issues that emerge in association with caring for this very ‘altered’ environment. Broadly speaking, the group has a role in examining (and hopefully reformulating) presently-dominant nativist focuses and practices in Landcare and environmentalism in Australia. Continue reading

Landcare learning about landscape function

The following post is a reprint of an article published in our local “Landcare Perspective” which is a newsletter put out by the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Council (a district level Landcare association, or ‘DLA’). The post was prompted by the article shown below, which appeared in the Winter-Spring 2014 edition of the Perspective….

The Bank Job Article from the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Perspective

The Bank Job Article from the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Perspective

….and, to a lesser extent by this ‘placestories’ video, which is also about ‘the Bank Job’ project.

The most stimulating aspect of these reports about ‘the Bank Job’ was that they both repeatedly blamed a single willow for causing the 10m deep incision that it was growing at the bottom of! No other causes were ever mentioned. Continue reading

‘Correspondence in’ from the Upper Shoalhaven Landcare Council

Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare Group was recently formally granted affiliate status by the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare Council (a district Landcare association). This affiliation provides us and other local Landcare groups in the Upper-Shoalhaven catchment with insurance for members and volunteers for all Landcare sites, projects and events. The need for coverage is an annoyance, but remains a necessary evil for most community groups like ours.

Regardless of this, we are delighted and consider affiliation as somewhat of a milestone, as it signifies the arrival of our group as a member of the Upper-Shoalhaven Landcare community. We look forward to interacting and sharing our learning experiences with our fellow Landcarers and others within the wider community in future. Continue reading