Tag Archives: water birds

Two great landscape rehydration field days

Hi folks,

There’ll be two excellent Natural Sequence Farming and landscape rehydration field days held consecutively on Nov 7th and 8th near Bungendore, NSW. I expect every innovative Landcarer in the country will be there, or will die trying to get there, for one or both of these days.

The first (Nov 7th) is a tour to see restorative bed structures on Turallo Creek at the “the Gib”.

(Click the image below to see the full-sized flyer.)

Turallo Ck field day 7th November

The structures installed at the Gib were put in by the landholder using ordinary farm equipment and have had a great effect on what was once a dry and eroded gully. This is another example of an empowered land manager doing excellent practical work that positively benefits landscape health and farm productivity. As it turns out, existing regulatory frameworks have made this beneficial process more difficult than it should be.

These frameworks will be discussed in more detail at the second field day (Nov 8th) which will be a tour of Mulloon Creek Natural Farms. Attendees will inspect and discuss the Natural Sequence Farming rehydration works completed here nine years ago. See the beneficial effects of these structures and hear about how the Mulloon Institute, in partnership with other organisations, is now supporting the Mulloon Creek community to work together on a multi-property catchment-wide rehydration effort.

(Click the image below)

Mulloon Creek field day 8th November

Both field days will be well-attended and are bound to promote some great discussion and learning opportunities. Spread the word and be there!

 

Our Hero Nativist. (Or how the Australian Humanist of the Year 2005 has made my family miserable and set back riverine repair by decades)

The Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare Group blog is a collaborative effort. We’re happy to publish your contributions as part of this Landcare Network discussion. See the collaborate-contribute page for a range of topic suggestions or get in touch to discuss your idea.

Here’s a new post from Mr. Peter Marshall (see introduction and background here), in which he points out that even our most respected scientists are sometimes liable to provide poorly-reasoned nativist prejudice in place of rational ecological assessment and objective science.



Our Hero Nativist.  (Or how the Australian Humanist of the Year 2005 has made my family miserable and set back riverine repair by decades)

Had yet another Field Day at our place recently. The usual inspiring, educational, well catered for gift of a day from my family to the Landcare world. But there was hostile body language and muttered comments from one group when viewing a stand of Heritage Cricket Bat Willows (single sex, non invasive, far from water courses).

As we were making our goodbyes the alpha male of the group stepped forward. He said, “Tim Flannery thinks you are a horrible person!” then turned and ran up the bus steps. A real downer for my hospitable family after an exhausting few days. Continue reading

What We Did In The Holidays

The Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare Group blog is a collaborative effort. We’re happy to publish your contributions as part of this Landcare Network discussion. See the collaborate-contribute page for a range of topic suggestions or get in touch to discuss your idea.

Here’s a new post from Mr. Peter Marshall (see introduction and background here) about continuing wetland restoration work at his family’s farm, ‘Sunningdale’, over the holiday period.



What We Did In The Holidays

Santa really hit the spot. He gave me a beautiful Empress Lotus in a tub.

Maybe he thought the tub wasn’t big enough. Because next day he sent one of his best elves at the controls of a 22 ton excavator.

6 hours later we had a much bigger planting place. Continue reading

Retarding Australia to an ecological nonsense

It will no doubt become a recurring theme of Flood Creek Non-Nativist Landcare to point out the limited perspectives informing destructive nativist activities in Australia (and elsewhere). These perspectives are dominated by such a narrow form of Ecology that they are effectively a reductionist science (anathema to a broader Ecological epistemology and understanding).

‘Natural Ecology’, as it’s widely practiced by professional and lay-ecologists in environmental groups and NRM bureaucracies, has become simply a “science” of naming, categorising, and compiling inventories, of species. So much so that these preoccupations often substitute for any real knowledge of how bio-physical systems actually function.

Continue reading